Cicero, fully Marcus Tullius Cicero, anglicized as Tully

Cicero, fully Marcus Tullius Cicero, anglicized as Tully
106
43 B.C.

Roman Philosopher, Statesman, Lawyer, Political Theorist, and Roman Constitutionalist, considered one of Rome's greatest Orators and Prose Stylists

Author Quotes

Friendship improves happiness, and abates misery, by doubling our joys, and dividing our grief.

Times are bad. Children no longer obey their parents, and everyone is writing a book.

Six mistakes mankind keeps making century after century: Believing that personal gain is made by crushing others; Worrying about things that cannot be changed or corrected; Insisting that a thing is impossible because we cannot accomplish it; Refusing to set aside trivial preferences; Neglecting development and refinement of the mind; Attempting to compel others to believe and live as we do.

If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need.

When I reflect on the nature of the soul, it seems to me by far more difficult and obscure to determine its character while it is in the body, a strange domicile, than to imagine what it is when it leaves it, and has arrived in the empyreal regions, in its own and proper home.

When arms speak, the laws are silent.

Whatever that which feels, which has knowledge, which wills, which has the power of growth, it is celestial and divine, and for that reason must of necessity be eternal.

We were born to unite with our fellowmen, and to join in community with the human race.

To live according to nature is the highest good; that is, to lead a life regulated by conscience and conformed to virtue and temperance.

To give and receive advice – the former with freedom and yet without bitterness, the latter with patience and without irritation – is peculiarly appropriate to genuine friendship.

There is nothing so characteristic of narrowness and littleness of soul as the love of riches.

There is no better way to convince others then first to convince oneself.

The sufferings of the mind are more severe than the pains of the body.

The safety of the people shall be their highest law.

The origin of justice is to be sought in the divine law of eternal and immutable morality.

The chief way to gain good will is by good deeds.

No greater curse in life can be found than knavery that wears the mask of wisdom.

It is a trait of fools to perceive the faults of others but not their own.

In nothing is the uniformity of human nature more conspicuous than in its respect for virtue.

If I err in my belief that the souls of men are immortal, I err gladly, and I do not wish to lose so delightful an error.

Friendship is the only thing in the world concerning the usefulness of which all mankind are agreed.

Freedom is participating in power.

Advice is generally judged by results, not by intentions.

A great many people do many things that seem to be inspired more by a spirit of ostentation than by heartfelt kindness… Such a pose is nearer akin to hypocrisy than to generosity or moral goodness.

Where is there dignity unless there is honesty?

Author Picture
First Name
Cicero, fully Marcus Tullius Cicero, anglicized as Tully
Birth Date
106
Death Date
43 B.C.
Bio

Roman Philosopher, Statesman, Lawyer, Political Theorist, and Roman Constitutionalist, considered one of Rome's greatest Orators and Prose Stylists