Edwin Hubbell Chapin

Edwin Hubbell
Chapin
1814
1880

American Unitarian Clergy

Author Quotes

I know a good many people, I think, who are bigots, and who know they are bigots, and are sorry for it, but they dare not be anything else.

Often the elements that move and mold society, are the results of the sister's counsel, and the mother's prayer.

The worst effect of sin is within, and is manifest not in poverty, and pain, and bodily defacement, but in the discrowned faculties, the unworthy love, the low ideal, the brutalized and enslaved spirit.

In the history of man it has been very generally the case, that when evils have grown insufferable they have touched the point of cure.

Ostentation is the signal flag of hypocrisy.

There are interests by the sacrifice of which peace is too dearly purchased. One should never be at peace to the shame of his own soul - to the violation of his integrity or of his allegiance to God.

It is a great thing, when the cup of bitterness is pressed to our lips, to feel that it is not fate or necessity, but divine love working upon us for good ends.

Out of suffering have emerged the strongest souls; the most massive characters are seamed with scars; martyrs have put on their coronation robes glittering with fire; and through their tears have the sorrowful first seen the gate of heaven.

There is less misery in being cheated than in that kind of wisdom which perceives, or thinks it perceives, that all mankind are cheats.

It is a most fearful fact to think of, that in every heart there is some secret spring that would be weak at the touch of temptation, and that is liable to be assailed. Fearful, and yet salutary to think of, for the thought may serve to keep our moral nature braced. It warns us that we can never stand at ease, or lie down in the field of life, without sentinels of watchfulness and campfires of prayer.

Pride is the master sin of the devil, and the devil is the father of lies.

There is no mockery like the mockery of that spirit which looks around in the world and believes that all is emptiness.

It is difficult to believe that a true gentleman will ever become a gamester, a libertine, or a sot.

Profaneness is a brutal vice. - He who indulges in it is no gentleman. - I care not what his stamp may be in society, or what clothes he wears, or what culture he boasts. - Despite all his refinement, the light and habitual taking of God's name in vain, betrays a coarse and brutal will.

There never was a man all intellect; but just in proportion as men become so they become like lofty mountains, all ice and snow the higher they rise above the warm heart of the earth.

It is exceedingly deleterious to withdraw the sanction of religion from amusement. If we feel that it is all injurious we should strip the earth of its flowers and blot out its pleasant sunshine.

Public feeling now is apt to side with the persecuted, and our modern martyr is full as likely to be smothered with roses as with coals.

Those old ages are like the landscape that shows best in the purple distance, all verdant and smooth, and bathed in mellow light.

It is the penalty of fame that a man must ever keep rising. - "Get a reputation, and then go to bed," is the absurdest of all maxims. - "Keep up a reputation or go to bed," would be nearer the truth.

The angels may have wider spheres of action and nobler forms of duty than ourselves, but truth and right to them and to us are one and the same thing.

Through every rift of discovery some seeming anomaly drops out of the darkness, and falls, as a golden link into the great chain of order.

A great many men — some comparatively small men now — if put in the right position, would be Luthers and Columbuses.

It is the veiled angel of sorrow who plucks away one thing and another that bound us here in ease and security, and, in the vanishing of these dear objects, indicates the true home of our affections and our peace.

The bosom can ache beneath diamond brooches; and many a blithe heart dances under coarse wool.

Tribulation will not hurt you, unless as it too often does; it hardens you and makes you sour, narrow and skeptical.

Author Picture
First Name
Edwin Hubbell
Last Name
Chapin
Birth Date
1814
Death Date
1880
Bio

American Unitarian Clergy