Malcolm Gladwell

Malcolm
Gladwell
1963

Canadian Journalist, Author and Speaker

Author Quotes

It wasn't an excuse. It was a fact. He'd had to make his way alone, and no one?not rock stars, not professional athletes, not software billionaires, and not even geniuses ? ever makes it alone.

Once a musician has enough ability to get into a top music school, the thing that distinguishes one performer from another is how hard he or she works. That's it. And what's more, the people at the very top don't work just harder or even much harder than everyone else. They work much, much harder.

Some people look like they sound better than they actually sound, because they look confident and have good posture, once musician, a veteran of many auditions, says. Other people look awful when they play but sound great. Other people have that belabored look when they play, but you can't hear it in the sound. There is always this dissonance between what you see and hear.

The David position is a high-risk position. There was a possibility he could fail.

The single most important thing a city can do is provide a community where interesting, smart people want to live with their families.

They were poor and living in the farthest corners of the Bronx. How did they afford tickets? Mary got a quarter, Friedman says. There was a Mary who was a ticket taker, and if you gave Mary a quarter, she would let you stand in the second balcony, without a ticket. ... and what you learn in that world is that through your own powers of persuasion and initiative, you can take your kids to Carnegie Hall. There is no better lesson for a budding lawyer than that. The garment industry was boot camp for the professionals.

What happens when two people talk? That is really the basic question here, because, that's the basic context in which all persuasion takes place.

It would be interesting to find out what goes on in that moment when someone looks at you and comes to all sorts of conclusions.

Our acquaintances?not our friends?are our greatest source of new ideas and information. the internet lets us exploit the power of these kinds of distant connections with marvelous efficiency.

Sometimes constraints actually create success. Not being able to swim made me run. And running taught me the discipline I needed as a writer.

The entire principle of a blind taste test was ridiculous. They shouldn't have cared so much that they were losing blind taste tests with old Coke, and we shouldn't at all be surprised that Pepsi's dominance in blind taste tests never translated to much in the real world. Why not? Because in the real world, no one ever drinks Coca-Cola blind.

The three rules of the Tipping Point -- The Law of the Few, the Stickiness Factor, the Power of Context -- offer a way of making sense of epidemics. They provide us with direction for how to go about reaching a Tipping Point.

Those with health insurance are over-insured and their behavior is distorted by moral hazard. Those without health insurance use their own money to make decisions based on an assessment of their needs. The insured are wasteful. The uninsured are prudent. So what's the solution? Make the insured a little more like the uninsured.

What must underlie successful epidemics, in the end, is a bedrock belief that change is possible, that people can radically transform their behavior or beliefs in the face of the right kind of impetus.

It's not how much money ultimately we make that makes us happy between 9-5; it's whether our work fulfills us.

Our first impressions are generated by our experiences and our environment, which means that we can change our first impressions . . . by changing the experiences that comprise those impressions.

Specht says, It meant I know you think I'm worth it, because that's what it was with the guys in the room. They were going to take a woman and make her the object. I was defensive and defiant. I thought, I'll fight you. Don't you tell me what I am. You've been telling me what I am for generations.

The ethics of plagiarism have turned into the narcissism of small differences: because journalism cannot own up to its heavily derivative nature, it must enforce originality on the level of the sentence.

The Tipping Point is the biography of an idea, and the idea is very simple. It is that the best way to understand the emergence of fashion trends, the ebb and flow of crime waves, or, for that matter, the transformation of unknown books into bestsellers, or the rise of teenage smoking, or the phenomena of word of mouth, or any number of the other mysterious changes that mark everyday life is to think of them as epidemics. Ideas and products and messages and behaviors spread just like viruses do.

To be someone's best friend requires a minimum investment of time. More than that, though, it takes emotional energy. Caring about someone deeply is exhausting.

When I saw the Kouros for the first time, he said, I felt as though there was a glass between me and the work.

It's not how much money we make that ultimately makes us happy between nine and five. It's whether or not our work fulfills us. Being a teacher is meaningful.

Our power of thin-slicing and snap judgment are extraordinary. But even the giant computer in our unconscious need a moment to do its work.

Success has to do with deliberate practice. Practice must be focused, determined, and in an environment where there's feedback.

The face is not a secondary billboard for our internal feelings. It is an equal partner in the emotional process.

Author Picture
First Name
Malcolm
Last Name
Gladwell
Birth Date
1963
Bio

Canadian Journalist, Author and Speaker