Forgive

To be happy: Live one day at a time. Take advantage of what you already have. Have a sense of humor. Set some priorities. Make a change and stick to it. Forgive and forget. Count your blessings.

However fastidious we may be in love, we forgive more faults in love than in friendship.

Out of the ashes of misanthropy benevolence rises again; we find many virtues where we had imagined all was vice, many acts of disinterested friendship where we had fancied all was calculation and fraud - and so gradually from the two extremes we pass to the proper medium; and, feeling that no human being is wholly good or wholly base, we learn that true knowledge of mankind which induces us to expect little and forgive much. The world cures alike the optimist and the misanthrope.

It is easier to forgive an enemy than a friend.

May I tell you why it seems to me a good thing for us to remember wrong that has been done to us? That we may forgive it.

Children are very nice observers, and they will often perceive your slightest defects. In general, those who govern children forgive nothing in them but everything in themselves.

God will forgive me. That's his business.

He who cannot forgive others breaks the bridge over which he himself must pass; for every man has the need to be forgiven.

The only reason I always try to meet and know the parents is because it helps me to forgive their children.

To be happy is easy enough if we give ourselves, forgive others, and live with thanksgiving. No self-centered person, no ungrateful soul can ever be happy, much less make anyone else happy. Life is giving, not getting.

We forgive so long as we love.

We often forgive those who bore us, but cannot forgive those we bore.

Everybody is a bit right; nobody is completely right or completely wrong. The prevalence of this point of view among all decent people nearly always has the same dreadful result for, according to their doctrine, every time a contemporary is quite right, he must be crucified. They can never forgive him because he denies their dogma; worst still, he reveals that they hold another dogma which they conceal.

Children begin by loving their parents: after a time they judge them: rarely, if ever, do they forgive them.

One of the secrets of a long and fruitful life is to forgive everybody everything every night before you go to bed.

Men never forgive those in whom there is nothing to pardon.

Learning to forgive is much more useful than merely picking up a stone and throwing it at the object of one’s anger, the more so when the provocation is extreme. For it is under the greatest adversity that there exists the greatest potential for doing good, both for oneself and others.

The only sin which people never forgive in each other is difference of opinion.

How does time become holy? It becomes holy when a part of it is given to others, when we share and care and listen. Time is sanctified when we use it – to forgive and ask forgiveness; to remember things too long forgotten and to forget things too long remembered; to reclaim sacred things too casually abandoned and to abandon shabby things too highly cherished; to remember that life’s most crucial question is – how are we using time?