Wole Soyinka, fully Akinwande Oluwole "Wole" Babatunde Soyinka

Wole
Soyinka, fully Akinwande Oluwole "Wole" Babatunde Soyinka
1934

Nigerian Author, Playwright and Poet, Awarded Nobel Prize in Literature

Author Quotes

And I believe that the best learning process of any kind of craft is just to look at the work of others.

Given the scale of trauma caused by the genocide, Rwanda has indicated that however thin the hope of a community can be, a hero always emerges. Although no one can dare claim that it is now a perfect state, and that no more work is needed, Rwanda has risen from the ashes as a model or truth and reconciliation.

I like my peace and quiet whenever I can grab it.

I've done a lot of guerrilla theater in my time.

One thing I can tell you is this, that I am not a methodical writer.

The blatant aggressiveness of theocracies I find distressing, because I grew up when Christians, Muslim and animists lived peacefully together.

There is only one home to the life of a river-mussel; there is only one home to the life of a tortoise; there is only one shell to the soul of man: there is only one world to the spirit of our race. If that world leaves its course and smashes on boulders of the great void, whose world will give us shelter?

What I looked forward to so much was the day I would hug Abiola, but that never happened. Let us not talk about that now. Let us concentrate on the inspiration that Abiola and his family have been to us.

Art is solace; art is vision, and when I pick up a literary work, I am a consumer of literature for its own sake.

History teaches us to beware of the excitation of the liberated and the injustices that often accompany their righteous thirst for justice.

I like to say, 'I spend one-third of my time in Nigeria, one-third in Europe or America, and one-third on a plane.'

Just like birds, hunters know no borders.

One, a mass movement from within, which, as you know, is constantly being put down brutally but which, again, regroups and moves forward as is happening right now as we are speaking.

The greatest threat to freedom is the absence of criticism.

There is something really horrific for any human being who feels he is being consumed by other people. I'm talking about a writer's critics, who don't address what you've written, but want to probe into your existence and magnify the trivia of your life without any sense of humor, without any sense of context.

When I write plays, I'm already seeing the shapes on stage, of the actors and their interaction, and so on and so forth. I don't think I've ever written one play as an abstract piece, as a literary piece, floating in the air somewhere, to be flushed out later on.

Before you're a writer, you're a citizen, a human being, and therefore the weapons of the citizen are at your disposal to use or not use.

Human life has meaning only to that degree and as long as it is lived in the service of humanity.

I love beauty. But I like the beauty accidentally, not dished up, served up on a platter.

Let?s say there are prospects for a new Nigeria, but I don?t think we have a new Nigeria yet.

One's own self-worth is tied to the worth of the community to which one belongs, which is intimately connected to humanity in general. What happens in Darfur becomes an assault on my own community, and on me as an individual. That's what the human family is all about.

The hand that dips into the bottom of the pot will eat the biggest snail.

There's a kind of dynamic quality about theater and that dynamic quality expresses itself in relation to, first of all, the environment in which it's being staged; then the audience, the nature of the audience, the quality of the audience.

Writers and intellectuals have a duty to humanity. It is to insist that the human entity remains the primary asset in overall development; thus, it must be safeguarded.

Being the first black Nobel laureate, and the first African, the African world considered me personal property. I lost the remaining shreds of my anonymity, even to walk a few yards in London, Paris or Frankfurt without being stopped.

Author Picture
First Name
Wole
Last Name
Soyinka, fully Akinwande Oluwole "Wole" Babatunde Soyinka
Birth Date
1934
Bio

Nigerian Author, Playwright and Poet, Awarded Nobel Prize in Literature