I Ching, Book of Changes or Zhouyi

I Ching, Book of Changes or Zhouyi
c. 400 B.C.
c. 223 B.C.

Traditionally it was believed that the principles of the I Ching originated with the mythical Fu Xi.

Author Quotes

The quiet and solitary man apprehends the inscrutable. He seeks nothing, holds to the mean, and remains free from entanglements.

Water everywhere over the earth flows to join together. A single natural law controls it. Each human is a member of a community and should work within it.

Everything proceeds as if of its own accord and this can all too easily tempt us to relax and let things take their course without troubling over details. Such indifference is the root of all evil.

Great effort is required to arrest decay and restore vigor. One must exercise proper deliberation, plan carefully before making a move, and be alert in guarding against relapse following a renaissance.

Secret forces are bringing compatible spirits together. If the man permits himself to be led by this ineffable attraction, good fortune will come his way. When deep friendships exist, formalities and elaborate preparations are not necessary

Adversity breaks the inferior man's will but only bends the superior man's spirit. Outward influence is denied the great man, who accordingly uses words sparingly but retains his central position.

The way of the creative works through change and transformation, so that each thing receives its true nature and destiny and comes into permanent accord with the great harmony: this is what furthers and what perseveres.

Change is certain. Peace is followed by disturbances; departure of evil men by their return. Such recurrences should not constitute occasions for sadness but realities for awareness, so that one may be happy in the interim.

It is only when we have the courage to face things exactly as they are,without any self-deception or illusion, that a light will develop out of events,by which the path to success may be recognized.

The superior man perseveres long in his course, adapts to the times, but remains firm in his direction and correct in his goals.

When clouds form in the skies we know that rain will follow but we must not wait for it. Nothing will be achieved by attempting to interfere with the future before the time is ripe. Patience is needed.

Great indeed is the sublimity of the Creative, to which all beings owe their beginning and which permeates all heaven.

Indecision regarding the choice among pleasures temporarily robs a man of inner peace. After due reflection, he attains joy by turning away from the lower pleasures and seeking the higher ones.

Creativity comes from awakening and directing men's higher natures, which originate in the primal depths of the universe and are appointed by Heaven.

Instead of solid accomplishments, the man pursues pleasures and self-gratification. He will never achieve anything so long as he is surrounded by dissipating temptations.

Everything proceeds as if of its own accord, and this can all too easily tempt us to relax and let things take their course without troubling over details. Such indifference is the root of all evil.

The Creative knows the great beginnings. The Receptive completes the finished things.

Before the beginning of great brilliance, there must be chaos. Before a brilliant person begins something great, they must look foolish in the crowd.

Author Picture
First Name
I Ching, Book of Changes or Zhouyi
Birth Date
c. 400 B.C.
Death Date
c. 223 B.C.
Bio

Traditionally it was believed that the principles of the I Ching originated with the mythical Fu Xi.