Marie Curie, fully Marie Skłodowska-Curie, originally Manya Sklodowska

Marie
Curie, fully Marie Skłodowska-Curie, originally Manya Sklodowska
1867
1934

Polish-born French Physicist, Winner of Two Nobel Prizes including one in Chemistry and one on Radioactivity

Author Quotes

One of our pleasures was to enter our workshop at night; then, all around us we would see the luminous silhouettes of the beakers and capsules that contained our products.

I am among those who think that science has great beauty. A scientist in his laboratory is not only a technician: he is also a child placed before natural phenomena which impress him like a fairy tale. We should not allow it to be believed that all scientific progress can be reduced to mechanisms, machines, gearings, even though such machinery also has its beauty. Neither do I believe that the spirit of adventure runs any risk of disappearing in our world. If I see anything vital around me, it is precisely that spirit of adventure, which seems indestructible and is akin to curiosity.

Radium is not to enrich any one. It is an element; it is for all people.

I am one of those who think like Nobel, than humanity will draw more good than evil from new discoveries.

Scientific work must not be considered from the point of view of the direct usefulness of it. It must be done for itself, for the beauty of science, and then there is always the chance that a scientific discovery may become like the radium, a benefit.

I believe international work is a heavy task, but that it is nevertheless indispensable to go through an apprenticeship in it, at the cost of many efforts and also of a real spirit of sacrifice: however imperfect it may be, the work of Geneva has a grandeur that deserves our support.

So perished the hope founded on the wonderful being who thus ceased to be. In the study room to which he was never to return, the water buttercups he had brought from the country were still fresh.

I have frequently been questioned, especially by women, of how I could reconcile family life with a scientific career. Well, it has not been easy.

Sometimes my courage fails me and I think I ought to stop working, live in the country and devote myself to gardening. But I am held by a thousand bonds, and I don't know when I shall be able to arrange things otherwise. Nor do I know whether, even by writing scientific books, I could live without the laboratory.

I have no dress except the one I wear every day. If you are going to be kind enough to give me one, please let it be practical and dark so that I can put it on afterwards to go to the laboratory.

The older one gets, the more one feels that the present moment must be enjoyed, comparable to a state of grace.

I never see what has been done; I only see what remains to be done.

I shall devote only a few lines to the expression of my belief in the importance of science ? it is by this daily striving after knowledge that man has raised himself to the unique position he occupies on earth, and that his power and well-being have continually increased.

I walked beside the evening sea And dreamed a dream that could not be; The waves that plunged along the shore Said only: "Dreamer, dream no more!"

A scientist in his laboratory is not a mere technician: he is also a child confronting natural phenomena that impress him as though they were fairy tales.

I was taught that the way of progress I neither swift nor easy.

Ignoring the possibility of personal involvement is the first step to panic and tragedy.

We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be attained.

Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and above all confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something and that this thing must be attained.

Be less curious about people and more curious about ideas.

You cannot hope to build a better world without improving the individuals. To that end each of us must work for his own improvement, and at the same time share a general responsibility for all humanity, our particular duty being to aid those to whom we think we can be most useful.

Nothing in life is to be feared, it is only to be understood. Now is the time to understand more, so that we may fear less.

One never notices what has been done; one can only see what remains to be done.

Author Picture
First Name
Marie
Last Name
Curie, fully Marie Skłodowska-Curie, originally Manya Sklodowska
Birth Date
1867
Death Date
1934
Bio

Polish-born French Physicist, Winner of Two Nobel Prizes including one in Chemistry and one on Radioactivity