Miguel de Molinos

Miguel de
Molinos
1640
1696

Spanish Theologian, chief apostle of the religious revival known as Quietism. Died in prison after admitting heresy to the Inquisition.

Author Quotes

To the end God may rest in the Soul, the Heart is always to be kept peaceable in whatsoever
Disquiet, Temptation and Tribulation.
1. Thou art to know, that thy Soul is the Center, Habitation, and the Kingdom of God. That
therefore, to the end the Sovereign King may rest on that Throne of thy Soul, thou ought to take
pains to keep it clean, quiet, void and peaceable; clean from guilt and defects; quiet from fears;
void of affections, desires, and thoughts; and peaceable in temptations and tribulations.
2. Thou ought always then to keep thine Heart in peace; that thou may keep pure that
Temple of God, and with a right and pure intention, thou art to work, pray, obey and suffer,
without being in the least moved, whatever it pleases the Lord to send unto thee. Because it is
certain, that for the good of thy Soul, and for thy spiritual profit, he will suffer the envious enemy
to trouble that City of Rest, and Throne of Peace, with temptations, suggestions and tribulations,
and by the means of creature, with painful troubles and grievous persecutions.
3. Be constant, and cheer up thine heart in whatsoever disquiet these tribulations may
cause to thee. Enter within it, that thou may overcome it; for therein is the Divine Fortress, which
defends, protects, and fights for thee. If a man hath a safe Fortress, he is not disquieted, though
his enemies pursue him; because, by retreating within it, these are disappointed and overcome.
The strong Castle, that will make thee triumph over all thine enemies, visible and invisible, and
over all their snares and tribulations, is within thine own Soul, because in it resides the Divine Aid
and Sovereign Succour. Retreat within it and all will be quiet, secure, peaceable and calm.

There are moreover two ways of Contemplation: The one is Imperfect, Active and Acquired;
The other Infused and Passive. The Active (whereof we have treated hitherto) is that which may
be attained to by our Diligence, assisted with Divine Grace; we gathering together the Faculties
and Senses, and preparing our selves by every way that God would have.

We think more highly of God, by knowing that he is incomprehensible, and
above all our capacity, than by conceiving him under any image or created beauty, according to
our rude understanding. A greater esteem and love then will flow from this confused, obscure and
negative, than from any other sensible and distinct way; because that is more proper to God, and
abstracted from creatures; and this, on the contrary, the more it depends on creatures, the less it
hath of God.

There are two ways of going to God, the one by Consideration and Mental Discourse, and the
other by the Purity of Faith, an indistinct, general and confused knowledge. The first is called
Meditation, the second Internal Recollection, or acquir’d Contemplation. The first is of Beginners,
the second of Proficients. The first is sensible and material, the second more naked, pure and
internal.

By two ways one may go to God, the first by Meditation and Discourse or Reasoning; the second
by pure Faith and Contemplation.

Mystical knowledge proceeds not from Wit, but from Experience; it is not invented, but
proved; not read, but received; and is therefore most secure and efficacious, of great help and
plentiful in fruit; it enters not (Mat.II.) into the Soul by Ears, nor by the continual Reading of
Books, but by the free Infusion of the Holy Ghost, whose Grace with most delightful intimacy, is
communicated to the simple and lowly.

Which disentangles the Soul, and by the
inward way, leads it to the Fruition of
Perfect Contemplation, and of the
rich Treasure of Internal Peace.

To the end God may rest in the Soul, the Heart is always to be
kept peaceable in whatsoever Disquiet, Temptation and Tribulation. Thou art to know, that thy Soul is the Center, Habitation, and the
Kingdom of God. That therefore, to the end the Sovereign King may
rest on that Throne of thy Soul, thou ought to take pains to keep it
clean, quiet, void and peaceable; clean from guilt and defects; quiet
from fears; void of affections, desires, and thoughts; and peaceable in
temptations and tribulations.

By two ways one may go to God, the first
by Meditation and Discourse or Reasoning;
the second by pure Faith and Contemplation. There are two ways of going to God, the one by Consideration and
Mental Discourse, and the other by the Purity of Faith, an indistinct,
general and confused knowledge. The first is called Meditation, the
second Internal Recollection, or acquir’d Contemplation. The first is
of Beginners, the second of Proficients. The first is sensible and material, the second more naked, pure and internal

The many and grievous pains and difficulties of the inward way ought not to make a Soul despond, because it is but
reasonable that a thing of great value should cost dear. Be of
good comfort, and believe, that not only those which are here
represented, but many others also will be overcome with the Grace
of God and internal Fortitude

Mystical knowledge proceeds not from Wit, but from Experience; it is not invented, but proved; not read, but received;
and is therefore most secure and efficacious, of great help and
plentiful in fruit; it enters not (Mat.II.) into the Soul by Ears, nor1 3
by the continual Reading of Books, but by the free Infusion of the
Holy Ghost, whose Grace with most delightful intimacy, is communicated to the simple and lowly.

There is nothing more difficult, than to please all People, not
more easie and common than to censure Books that come abroad
in the World. All Books, without exception, that see the light, run
the common Risk of both these inconveniences, though they may
be sheltered under the most sublime Protection, what will become of this little Book then, which hath no Patronage? The Subject whereof being mystical, and not well-seasoned; carries along
with it the common censure, and will seem insipid? Kind Reader,
if you understand it not, be not therefore apt to censure the same.
The Natural Man may hear and read these Spiritual Matters, but he can never comprehend them.

Inward solitude is that which cheiefly brings a Man to
the purchase of Internal Peace.

The Means of obtaining Peace Internal, is not the delight of Sense nor Spiritual Consolation, but the denying
of Self-love

Of Spiritual Martyrdoms whereby God Purges Souls; of Contemplation Infused and Passive; of Perfect Resignation, Inward
Humility, Divine Wisdom, True Annihilation, and Internal
Peace

Though the Soul perceive it self deprived of Discourse,
or Ratiocination, yet it ought to presevere in Prayer, and
not be afflicted, because that is its greater Felicity.

Vows about doing something are impediments to perfection.

Thou art never at any time nearer to God than when under tribulation; which He permits for the purification and beautifying of thy soul.

Author Picture
First Name
Miguel de
Last Name
Molinos
Birth Date
1640
Death Date
1696
Bio

Spanish Theologian, chief apostle of the religious revival known as Quietism. Died in prison after admitting heresy to the Inquisition.