Mind

There is scarcely a man who is not conscious of the benefits which his own mind has received from the performance of single acts of benevolence. How strange that so few of us try a course of the same medicine!

Man's mind is his essence; he is where his thoughts are.

It is better to inspire the heart with a noble sentiment than to teach the mind a truth of science.

To serve is beautiful, but only if it is done with joy and a whole heart and a free mind.

The person who tries to live alone will not succeed as a human being. His heart withers if it does not answer another heart. His mind shrinks away if he hears only the echoes of his own thoughts and finds no other inspiration.

Anger will never disappear so long as there are thoughts of resentment in the mind. Anger will disappear just as soon as thoughts of resentment are forgotten.

Be a lamp unto yourselves! Work out your liberation with diligence! Fill your mind with compassion!

Mindfulness should be strong everywhere, for mindfulness keeps the mind away from distraction, into which it might fall, since faith, energy and understanding partake of the nature of distraction: and away from idleness, into which it might fall, since concentration partakes of the nature of idleness.

Night is the Sabbath of mankind, to rest the body and the mind.

The monarch of his own mind is the only real potentate.

Aversion from reproof is not wise. It is a mark of a little mind. A great man can afford to lose; a little, insignificant fellow is afraid of being snuffed out.

The human mind feels restless and dissatisfied under the anxieties of ignorance. It longs for the repose of conviction; and to gain this repose it will often rather precipitate its conclusions than wait for the tardy lights of observation and experiment. There is such a thing, too, as the love of simplicity and system, a prejudice of the understanding which disposes it to include al the phenomena of nature under a few sweeping generalities, and indolence which loves to repose on the beauties of a theory rather than encounter the fatiguing detail of its evidences.

Conviction is the conscience of the mind.

Every mind was made for growth, for knowledge; and its nature is sinned against when it is doomed to ignorance.

Reading furnishes the mind only with the materials of knowledge; it is thinking that makes what we read ours.

One need not mind stealing, but one must cry out at people whose minds are so befuddled that they do not know theft when they see it.

The lessons of adversity are often the most benignant when they seem the most severe. The depression of vanity sometimes ennobles the feeling. The mind which does not wholly sink under misfortune rises above it more lofty than before, and is strengthened by affliction.