Great Throughts Treasury

A database of quotes

Related Quotes

Alexandre Dumas, born Dumas Davy de la Pailleterie

Pure love and suspicion cannot dwell together: at the door where the latter enters, the former makes its exit.

Character | Love | Suspicion | Wisdom |

Thomas Jefferson

Men are naturally divided into two parties: (1) those who fear and distrust the people... (2) those who identify themselves with people, have confidence in them, cherish and consider than as the most honest and safe.

Character | Confidence | Distrust | Fear | Men | People | Safe |

August von Kotzebue, fully August Friedrich Ferdinand von Kotzebue

A heart once poisoned by suspicion has no longer room for love.

Character | Heart | Love | Suspicion |

Walter Savage Landor

Politeness is not always a sign of wisdom. but the want of it always leaves room for a suspicion of folly, if folly and imprudence are the same.

Character | Folly | Suspicion | Wisdom |

Walter Savage Landor

There is no outward sign of politeness which has not a deep, moral reason. Behavior is a mirror in which every one shows his own image. There is a politeness of the heart akin to love, from which springs the easiest politeness of outward behavior... Politeness is not always a sign of wisdom, but the want of it always leaves room for the suspicion of folly.

Behavior | Character | Folly | Heart | Love | Reason | Suspicion | Wisdom | Politeness |

José Joaquín de Olmedo, fully José Joaquín de Olmedo y Maruri

They set the slave free, striking off his chains. Then he was as much of a slave as ever. He was still chained to servility. He was still manacled to indolence and sloth, he was still bound by fear and superstition, by ignorance suspicion and savagery. His slavery was not in the chains, but in himself. They can only set free men free. And there is no need of that. Free men set themselves free.

Character | Fear | Ignorance | Indolence | Men | Need | Slavery | Sloth | Superstition | Suspicion |

Publius Syrus

Suspicion breeds rivals for herself... The suspicious man condemns the good faith of all... Suspicion is an unspoken wrong to tested worth.

Character | Faith | Good | Man | Suspicion | Worth | Wrong |

Arthur Warwick

It is not good to speak of evil of all whom we know bad; it is worse to judge evil of any who may prove good. To speak ill upon knowledge shows a want of charity; to speak ill upon suspicion shows a want of honesty. I will not speak so bad as I know of many; I will not speak worse than I know of any. To know evil of others and not speak it, is sometimes discretion; to speak evils of others and not know it, is always dishonesty. He may be evil himself who speaks good of others upon knowledge, but he can never be good himself who speaks evil of others upon suspicion.

Character | Charity | Discretion | Dishonesty | Evil | Good | Honesty | Knowledge | Suspicion | Will |

G. K. Chesterton, fully Gilbert Keith Chesterton

Artistic temperament is a disease that afflicts amateurs.

Disease | Wisdom |

Cyril Connolly, fully Cyril Vernon Connolly

We must select the illusion which appeals to our temperament and embrace it with passion, if we want to be happy.

Happy | Illusion | Passion | Wisdom |

Tyron Edwards

Age does not depend upon years, but upon temperament and health. Some men are old, and some never grow so.

Age | Health | Men | Wisdom |

Joseph Farrell, fully Joseph Patrick Farrell

When a man thinks he is reading the character of another, he is often unconsciously betraying his own; and this is especially the case with those persons whose knowledge of the world is of such sort that it results in extreme distrust of men.

Character | Distrust | Extreme | Knowledge | Man | Men | Reading | Wisdom | World |

Benjamin Franklin

The great secret of succeeding in conversation is to admire little, hear much, always to distrust our own reason, and sometimes that of our friends; never to pretend to wit, but to make that of others appear as much as we possibly can; to hearken to what is said, and to answer to the purpose.

Conversation | Distrust | Little | Purpose | Purpose | Reason | Wisdom | Wit |

Norman Geschwind

One must remember that practically all of us have a number of significant learning disabilities. For example, I am grossly unmusical and cannot carry a tune. We happen to live in a society in which the child who has trouble learning to read is in difficulty. Yet we have all seen dyslexic children who have either superior visual-perception or visual-motor skills. My suspicion would be that in an illiterate society such a child would be in little difficulty and might in fact do better because of his superior visual-perception talents, while many of us who function here might do poorly in a society in which a quite different array of talents was needed in order to be successful. As the demands of society change will we acquire a new group of "minimally brain damaged?"

Better | Change | Children | Difficulty | Example | Learning | Little | Order | Perception | Society | Suspicion | Will | Wisdom | Society | Trouble | Child |

David Hume

To be happy, the temperament must be cheerful and gay, not gloomy and melancholy. A propensity to hope and joy, is real riches; one to fear and sorrow is real poverty.

Fear | Happy | Hope | Joy | Melancholy | Poverty | Riches | Sorrow | Wisdom |

John F. Kennedy, fully John Fitzgerald "Jack" Kennedy

Suspicion on one side breeds suspicion on the other, and new weapons beget counterweapons.

Suspicion | Weapons | Wisdom |

Friedrich Nietzsche, fully Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche

Gentlemen, let us distrust our first reactions; they are invariably much too favorable.

Distrust | Wisdom |